Rehabilitation Guideline after meniscus repair surgery

Meniscus injuries within the knee are a common occurrence.  In spite of this high event, numerous irregularities keep on existing in the restoration of a patient after meniscus repair surgery, especially including the rate of weight bearing and range of movement.

Rehabilitation Follow Meniscus Repair

Restoration after surgical debridement of the meniscus is entirely clear. We restore the patient’s range  of movement, quality and function,  their manifestations and let pain and swelling guide the recovery procedure (an exceptionally broad guide yet one frequently utilized by numerous rehabilitation specialists).

In any case, when the meniscus is really repaired and not only debrided, there are different variables to consider. At the point when a meniscus is repaired, the tear is approximated utilizing stitches to enable the tear to heal.

Rehabilitation following a meniscus repair has to be more conservative, however, despite research saying otherwise, there are still many rehabilitation protocols floating around the orthopaedic and sports medicine world that recommend limiting weight-bearing and range of motion after a meniscal repair.  We continue to ignore the literature because of fear that the ‘stress’ on the meniscus with walking and range of motion may be too high.

So if we’re going to talk some  protocols, take a look at these studies from way back when from Shelbourne et al  and Barber et al   that showed excellent results in patients undergoing a combined ACL-meniscus repair procedure and utilizing no limitations in weightbearing or range of motion, similar to a protocol for an isolated ACL reconstruction.

Recent studies from VanderHave et al  and Lind et al on isolated meniscus repairs have shown similar results using an “aggressive” program of immediate weightbearing compared to a more conservative approach.

Again, these studies show meniscal repair outcomes are no different while using restricted weight bearing and range of motion versus an “aggressive” protocol of immediate weight-bearing and unlimited range of motion.

 Weightbearing After Meniscus Repair : 

Things being what they are, if immobilized in extension, for what reason do we restrict weightbearing?

During weightbearing, compressive forces are loaded across the menisci. These tensile forces create ‘hoop stresses’, which expand the menisci in extension. These hoop stresses are believed to help the healing procedure in many tears by approximating the tissue.

Besides, the compressive loads connected while weightbearing in full expansion following a vertical, longitudinal repair or container handle repair have been appeared to lessen the meniscus and settle the tear, as noted by Rodeo et al.  and all the more as of late by McCulloch et al.

There are studies said “A repaired longitudinal medial meniscal tear undergo compression, not gapping, during simulated gait ”

What about early range of motion? 

 

 

 

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